Posted by: pjgron | February 25, 2017

National Clam Chowder Day and a Book

Today, we have a choice of National Days: National Chocolate Covered Nuts Day or National Clam Chowder Day. Which type of clam chowder is not specified in the holiday’s title, so I guess you can pick your poison – not that clam chowder is poison. I really like New England style clam chowder, so that’s what I am celebrating.

Writing a novel is work. For some authors, it comes easy, which makes it fun work. Ironic to some that “fun” and “work” are in the same sentence. I’m one of those authors who enjoy writing. I find the beginning easy to write, meaning the first fifty to one hundred pages. I also find the end of the book easy to write; again the last fifty to one hundred pages. What I find taxing is the middle section. The reason I find this part difficult because there are numerous subplots in play that must be tracked and addressed before the end of the manuscript. So the middle of the book gets rather…murky. As an author, you have to ensure that the story is not so murky that it is too difficult for the audience to follow. Some just might give up and move on to the next great story.

So give one of my novels a test run. Sit down with a bowl of your favorite chowder and some oyster crackers and crack open a bottle of your favorite regional brew. I think you’ll like the flow of the main plot, as well as those nagging little twists that come with life. I know it will keep you engaged and guessing…Whodunnit.

Drug Wars, by author P. J. Grondin, is available from Amazon and most major book store chains. Visit http://www.pjgrondin.com for more details on how to get your very own copy.

Posted by: pjgron | February 19, 2017

Happy National Chocolate Mint Day

Happy National Chocolate Mint Day. Or, if you prefer body parts, Happy Lash Day. I think I’m going for the mints.

When I write, if my antagonist is popping a chocolate mint into his mouth, I want the reader to get a sensation of not only the taste of the mint and chocolate, but the texture of the candy as it dissolves in their mouth. But it is, after all, just a piece of candy, so I don’t want to elevate the importance of said mint in relation to the story. There must be a balance between telling the reader about the sensation of eating the mint, and allowing the reader to take a limited description of the mint and form their own response, while enjoying what’s really important in a given passage.

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I get a bit of a thrill when a reader tells me that they formed their very own motion picture in their mind while reading one of my books. My latest release, Drug Wars, is based in Savannah, Georgia, so I’m anxious to hear from readers about their experience.  Could they picture themselves walking through the many public squares in the historic district or passing the fountain in Forsyth Park? Will they smell the aroma from the many restaurants, and feel the warm breeze rustling through the old southern oak trees, and hear the conversations of couples snuggling on benches, as they read the story? Pick up a copy of Drug Wars for yourself. Pop a chocolate mint in your mouth and let me know about your personal experience.

Drug Wars, by author P. J. Grondin, is available from Amazon and most major book store chains. Visit www.pjgrondin.com for more details on how to get your very own copy.

Posted by: pjgron | February 5, 2017

Shower With a Friend Day

I picked a good day to get back into blogging. Today, February 5, 2017 is National Shower with a Friend Day. Since my best friend is my wife…

Okay, I digress. My first novel in my new Peden Savage series is called Drug Wars. The protagonist, Peden Savage has a close friend, his former partner at the FBI, Megan Moore. Megan is a beautiful, but very serious woman. She doesn’t have much of a sense of humor, but she did help her old buddy, Peden, get out of what she believed to be a bad marriage. In drugwarswebcopythis  first story, they don’t shower together, but maybe by next year’s National Shower with a Friend Day, who knows.

Drug Wars, by author P. J. Grondin, is set in Historic Savannah, Georgia, and is available from Amazon and most major book store chains. Also available for most eBook readers. Visit P. J. Grondin’s Official Website for more details on getting your very own copy.

Posted by: pjgron | June 7, 2010

Five Things About Changing A Lifetime of Terror

When your creative juices flow, the words spill out on the page, like paint on a canvas.  The story just feels right.  But sometimes it doesn’t flow like you think it should.  Some obstacles that must be overcome are; not enough plot twists, too many characters, or lack of sensory touch points (like smells, or the heat of a room, or humidity that is so high, you feel like you’re swimming through the air).  With these thoughts in mind, after having completed about half of the first draft, I’m backing up and rewriting A Lifetime of Terror.  Here are five things I plan to do:

  1. Cut back on the number of characters.
  2. Add more adversity to Pat and Joe McK9inney’s lives.
  3. Provide more insight regarding why the bad guys are doing what they are doing.
  4. Add a couple more plot mis-directions.
  5. Add more details that affect the senses of the characters so that you feel like you’re with them, sensing what they sense.

This is a major change but I’m confident it will result in a better reading experience.  I owe it to you to make A Lifetime of Terror the best McKinney Brothers novel yet.

Pete PJ Grondin  –  Author of A Lifetime of Vengeance, A Lifetime of Deception,

and A Lifetime of Exposure

http://www.pjgrondin.com

Posted by: pjgron | February 25, 2009

Five Things About – Living on a Submarine

peteatperiscopeBeing a little slow, it took me six years out of high school to realize that I needed more training than a high school diploma.  So with no money for college, the US Navy seemed like a good way to go.  The recruiter in Sandusky asked me, “Do you have anything against nuclear power?”  This was shortly after Three Mile Island melted down their core, but remember, I’m a little slow on the uptake, so I said, “No, not at all.”  So I ended up on the ballistic missile submarine USS John Adams (SSBN 620B).  So here are five things about life on a submarine:  

1.      When underway, we generated our own oxygen.  No lie.

2.      We worked in six hour shifts, so our days and nights were all screwed up.  I still wake up at odd times, dreaming that I’m late for watch and I’ve been out of the Navy for nearly twenty years. 

3.      We drilled our butts off.  If we weren’t running drills in Engineering, we were running weapons drills or drills for fires, floods, and all sorts of mayhem. 

4.      Everyone was always tired and cranky.  You’re living inside a steel tube with a bunch of guys from all different backgrounds.  It gets a bit testy at times. 

5.      Except for marrying the love of my life, it was the best thing I’ve ever done.  It straightened out my life and gave me direction. 

catnapMilitary life isn’t for everyone, not even me.  After eight years, I’d had enough.  But it gave me the tools I needed to focus on my future.  It gave me the experience I needed to establish a solid foundation for my career.  It also made me appreciate the sacrifice that so many have made, with their blood, to make this country the greatest country in the world.  Whenever you have the opportunity, please thank a veteran for the freedoms you now enjoy.  Don’t let well meaning politicians strip our freedoms away. 

Pete Grondin – Author of A Lifetime of Deception

Posted by: pjgron | February 21, 2009

Five Things About – Writing

Five Things About – Writing 

I haven’t always wanted to be a writer.  In high school, I took a creative writing course because I thought it would be an easy class to pass the morning until I got out 11:30 AM to go to work.  The “Distributive Education” program that I was in allowed me to attend school half a day and work the other half.  I thought it was great. Just goes to show you that I didn’t know how much I didn’t know.  Here are five things that I love about writing:  

1.      Regardless of whether it’s technical writing for work or writing fiction novels for a future career, it exercises my mind.  It takes me places that I would not normally go.  

2.      I’m able to paint the most vivid mental pictures of places, people, and things that don’t even exist.  

3.      There are very few feelings that can compare when a complete stranger calls you out of the blue and compliments you on what you’ve written. It is especially exciting when they compare your work to a New York Times best seller.  

4.      Writing is so much more fun than sitting in front of the television watching other people’s creations.  I’d rather sit in front of a keyboard creating my own.  

5.      Having your works in print extends your life beyond the grave.  People could potentially be reading your quips of wisdom long after you’re pushing up daisies.  

Even though I work full time and writing is just a serious hobby, my mind is working overtime on new stories, twists, angles, and characters. I have two novels in print, one manuscript on its second draft, and one manuscript outline completed.  I could retire tomorrow and have enough material to work full time for at least five more years.  I love to write.  

Pete Grondin – author of A Lifetime of Deception  

www.pjgrondin.com

pjgron@pjgrondin.com

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